PK2021: Leaders for Their Church and Community

July 8, 2021By Nicole StarkUncategorized

‘Leaders for Their Church and Community’: Promise Keepers’ 2021 Men’s Conference Coming to Texas’ AT&T Stadium

Promise Keepers, a Christ-centered organization dedicated to helping men grow in their Christian faith, is gearing up for its 2021 men’s conference at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas from July 16 – 17.

Founded in 1990 by former University of Colorado football coach Bill McCartney, Promise Keepers (PK) is a movement that encourages men to be Christ-like leaders for their church and community.

The two-day event held at the home field of the Dallas Cowboys will feature a special panel of prominent speakers including Pastor AR Bernard; Jonathan Evans, chaplain for Dallas Cowboys; and Nick Vujicic, founder of Life Without Limbs; plus, many more.

Christian music artists Tauren Wells and Cody Carnes are also scheduled to perform at the July event.

“Promise Keepers is more than an organization; it is a movement in the hearts of men, turning them back to God in humility and repentance and toward each other in authentic relationships across generational, denominational, and racial divides,” said PK Chairman Ken Harrison. “Likewise, the stadium event is not just a program, but rather a platform for equipping men to function as ambassadors of reconciliation and service as a result of an authentic encounter with Jesus.”

For those who are unable to attend in person, the event will be simulcast around the globe.  It will be available via real-time audio translation with closed captions in multiple languages. The conference’s simulcast will be available to homes, small groups, churches, military bases, and colleges.

The event aims to bring a positive message that will inspire transformation and empower men so they can return home equipped to lead their families, communities, and country.

On another positive note for conference attendees, AT&T Stadium officials have lifted all COVID-19 seating restrictions for the event.

PK’s 2021 Men’s Conference is scheduled for Friday, July 16, from 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm and Saturday, July 17, from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm.

Click here to buy tickets: https://promisekeepers.brushfire.com/2021/454122

Click here to find a church simulcasting near you: www.promisekeepersevent.com/join

Men’s Marriage Virtual Summit

January 23, 2021By Nicole StarkPromise Keepers Event, Uncategorized

The Virtual Men’s Marriage Summit kicks off a 3-week challenge that will place you side by side virtually with other men as you build up your marriages in a concrete way. Any man, anywhere, at any time, can join the challenge through the Promise Keepers app.

Watch on Facebook

Watch on YouTube

After the virtual event, the challenge will be led on the Promise Keepers’ app and will include:

  • Daily scripture, activities and weekly challenges including leaderboards and gamification
  •  Additional resources from marriage experts – articles, videos, bonus materials and footage from the Marriage event
  • Community Group and Small groups discussion
  • 21 Day Prayer Guide (we will post one prayer each day, but you can also download the full 21-Day Prayer Guide as a PDF).

Step 1: Watch the event on Promise Keepers Facebook or YouTube

Step 2: Download the all-new Promise Keepers App

Step 3: Engage in the App Community and 3-week Challenge

Step 4: Invite friends to join!

7 Day Prayer Guide for UNITY

October 23, 2020By Nicole StarkUncategorized

One of the things we can do to build unity in the body of Christ is to pray together. Will you join me in praying these prayers for unity, knowing that kingdom disciples around our country are praying them as well? Words matter. Prayers have power. Let’s all stand together, speak up through collective prayer, and seek God’s hand of healing in our land.

MONDAY

Lord, help me to model unity just like Jesus did. Help me look beyond my own comfort zone and experience the strength of diversity. Make my voice one that encourages living in the power of unity. In Christ’s name I pray this.

TUESDAY

Lord, make my heart righteous through an intentional pursuit of unity. Use my life as a testimony of unity to others and give me wisdom on how I can contribute to strengthening the community around me, including this nation. In Christ’s name I pray this.

WEDNESDAY

Lord, my purpose is to glorify You and to make Your name known through the love I share with others in your name. Joy and peace come as we seek unity and live in a spirit of oneness. Let me walk in that oneness and experience its fruit. In Christ’s name I pray this.

THURSDAY

Lord, I ask that You help all who are called by Your name to live without divisions among us. Help us to be rooted in Your Word and Your truth. Let falsehood and lies be obvious to all. Give us discernment to know Your truth. In Christ’s name I pray this.

FRIDAY

Lord, I come to you in repentance for the disunity we have allowed among ourselves. I repent of our silence—the times we have not spoken up for unity when we were given the opportunity to do so. Forgive us for walking in division, hatred, spite, arrogance and animosity. In Christ’s name I pray this.

SATURDAY

Lord, You have told us in Scripture that our unity lets others know we are Your followers. May this become manifest in my life and in the lives of my family members, fellow church members and believers all across our nation and around the world. In Christ’s name I pray.

SUNDAY

Lord, may we in the body of Christ be more unified than ever before and lift up the shield of faith to defeat the destructive forces that seek to divide us. Christ’s name I pray.

 

This 7-Day Prayer Guide is provided by our partner ministry Dr. Tony Evans Urban Alternative

Message from Promise Keepers’ Chairman

March 17, 2020By Nicole StarkNews

We’re getting a lot of questions lately from people who bought tickets to the event on July 31 and August 1. We have people coming from 47 different states and several countries as far away as Zimbabwe and Norway. And I want to reassure you right now that we’re planning on being at AT&T July 31 and August 1.

We don’t know what’s going to come from all of this – the virus. We do know, though, that we don’t let our lives be ruled by fear. We know that all things work together for the good of those who love Jesus as we are called to His purpose in Romans 8:28. So I just want to encourage everyone – let’s stay in prayer, support each other and lift each other up, let’s wash our hands and listen to what people are telling us to do. And we will be praying for all of you guys.

Ken Harrison, Promise Keepers’ CEO and Chairman

Watch the video on Facebook

What Exactly is Humility?

January 9, 2020By Nicole StarkCulture, News, Rise of the Servant Kings, Values
This article appeared in the Christian Post.

Humility is clear eyesight. It is the ability to see things as they really are. A successful follower of Christ is humble. He places the needs of those in his care above his own. He doesn’t get his identity from what he has accomplished. He gets it from God.

Our flesh and our old nature see through a lens of self. We perceive things based on how they affect us. Pride distorts how we see the world. It causes our identity to be based on our accomplishments or lack thereof.

The thicker our lens of self — our pride — the less we see things as God sees them, which is how they really are. This is evident in the musings of a crazy person. As G. K. Chesterton described in Orthodoxy, a madman looks at himself as the center of all things. If he were to recognize that no one actually is focused on him, he would be infinitely happier because his world would suddenly become infinitely bigger. 

Pride shrinks the universe to a tiny world in which we are the god. As we die to self, we are able to see the world more clearly, as larger and more wonderful than we can comprehend. Pride is a miserable state because we don’t really inflate ourselves or our value. Instead, we shrink the universe to meet our limited imaginations.

Because we are fallen and therefore see things through our pride, we have difficulty judging ourselves properly. The more wicked people are, the higher their opinion of themselves tends to be. In order to properly judge ourselves, we must look at things from outside our own perspective. The way we react to things tells us where we are in our walk with Christ.

The insignificant things of daily life are the things that show us who we are. They show what spirit possesses us. It is our most unguarded moments that show us whether we walk in the Spirit or in the flesh. How do you react when you’re tired, hungry, cold, irritated, or stressed? Here we see what Jesus meant when He said, “Whoever is faithful in very little is also faithful in much, and whoever is unrighteous in very little is also unrighteous in much” (Luke 16:10).

People often mistake confidence for pride. Actually, the most confident people are usually the humblest, such as the great saints Abraham, David, Joseph, Paul, and Apollos. The Bible calls Moses, who led an entire nation out of slavery, the humblest man on earth (Numbers 12:3).

Let’s look at some aspects of a humble person. Search your heart. Do these characteristics look like you?

■ No longer compares himself with others.

■ Seeks no recognition for self.

■ Sees every person equally as a child of God and honors him or her as such.

■ Enjoys hearing others praised, even if he is forgotten.

■ Forgives.

■ Lives a life marked by patience.

■ Relationships are known for peace and unity.

■ Constantly encourages others.

We see humility as a virtue, but it is really the symptom of something else — the Holy Spirit reigning in a person as self has become less. The holiest is always the humblest.

Pride doesn’t always show up as arrogance. It can appear as self-loathing, shyness, obsession with guilt, or anger. This is because pride always comes from a focus on self.

I once confronted a Christian who was living in sin, and he yelled at me, “Don’t you think I feel bad about it?” I asked him what his feelings had to do with anything. Pride thinks that feeling guilty is some sort of penance. Guilt without repentance disregards those whom your sin has hurt. It is just a continued focus on self, simply flipping from arrogance to self-loathing. It’s all self.

Humility grows as our Lord is revealed to us. As we come to know the Savior and look up into His face, we become more aware of our own depravity. Not in a self-deprecating way, but with the gratitude of a child who realizes that he is completely dependent on God and that God loves him and has promised to never leave or forsake him (Deuteronomy 31:6; Hebrews 13:5).

Ken Harrison is CEO and chairman of Promise Keepers. Today, Promise Keepers is calling men back to bold servant leadership as change makers for their families, churches and communities. Harrison is also CEO of WaterStone, a Christian Community Foundation that oversees donations of millions of dollars a month to build God’s kingdom. After starting his career as an LAPD street cop in South Central, he spent nearly two decades in commercial real estate. Married and the father of three, Harrison has a new book, “The Rise of the Servant Kings: What the Bible Says About Being a Man.”

Generosity: The Tell-Tale Sign of Godly Masculinity

December 20, 2019By Nicole StarkDevotional

Many of the rivers in Oregon are cold and treacherous. When we were kids, our favorite river wound its way north along the eastern fringes of the Portland suburbs, through a thick forest of Douglas fir, spruce, and cedar. The river is deep and rocky, filled with crushing rapids and dangerous undertows.

There are several bridges that cross the river, where a kid can illegally jump into the icy waters fifty feet below. But danger lurks. Where the river was ten feet deep the summer before, it may be only two feet deep the next spring due to winter’s torrential rainfall washing a massive boulder downstream.

On a hot day in early spring, a boy from our high school named Mark was the first to throw himself from a bridge. He hit a rock that hadn’t been there before and was killed instantly. His parents prepared for the funeral and sent notice that everyone was welcome.

His Diary Revealed One Young Man’s Impact

My brother Frank wasn’t going to go to the funeral because he didn’t know Mark. My brother was a two-time all-state running back, was ruggedly handsome, and is one of the most loving people I’ve known.

Frank didn’t just have friends; he had hordes of kids following him through the halls, hoping for his attention. Yet Frank often searched the cafeteria for any student, boy or girl, who was sitting alone and sat down across from him or her, bringing his fan club with him. He’d grill the person he’d just met with questions and spend time talking. When you became Frank Harrison’s friend, you became everyone’s friend.

Mark had been one of those kids. Frank didn’t remember him but recognized his picture as someone he had spoken to once. Frank decided to go to the funeral because he wasn’t sure how many kids would attend, and he wanted to honor Mark.

During the service, Mark’s father read some excerpts from his son’s diary, including a pointed section about Mark’s rejection at high school and how a star football player had taken the time to talk to him and make him feel important.

That moment had changed his life and made Mark a popular kid at school and the leader in the church youth group. Mark’s father pointed at the square-jawed boy with the thick neck and bulging arms: “Frank Harrison was my son’s best friend,” he said.

Generosity Is Giving to God What Is Rightfully His

What my brother Frank did is generosity. Generosity is giving every aspect of yourself back to God, to whom it belongs. It’s giving Him your money, your prayers, your time, your effort, your reputation . . . your rights. Most often, we do this by giving to His children here on earth.

Generosity is actually the ultimate act of worship. Worship is not just singing and praising. Worship is generously and adoringly giving back to God what He has given us. A key part of doing that is seeking out ways to sacrificially meet the needs of others.

Generosity is the ultimate in trust because it says to God, “I can share my time, talents, and treasure with others because I know You will take care of me.” When you teach a child how to swim, you’ll ask him or her to jump from the side of the pool into your arms in the water. You have great joy when, in complete trust, your child leaps into your arms. Generosity is the same. When you practice generosity, you’re jumping into God’s arms, knowing He will care for you. And those around you receive a blessing as well.

A Generous Spirit Forgives

Forgiveness is the ultimate in giving to others what God has given us. To hold on to bitterness, resentment, and old wounds is to refuse to give away the forgiveness that Jesus gave us – the very basis of our salvation.

In many years of discipling men, I am amazed at how many are held back in life by resentment toward their fathers. Don’t get me wrong: hurt is a real thing. But it can only take two forms: open wounds or scars.

When you generously forgive, you release the other person, free yourself, and let God heal your wounds, so they become only just a scar. That’s the power of generosity.

Ken Harrison is CEO and chairman of Promise Keepers. Founded in 1990 by coach Bill McCartney, Promise Keepers was one of the largest Christ-centered movements; today, Promise Keepers is calling men back to bold servant leadership as change makers for their families, churches and communities. Harrison is also CEO of WaterStone, a Christian Community Foundation that oversees donations of millions of dollars a month to build God’s kingdom. After starting his career as an LAPD street cop in South Central, he spent nearly two decades in commercial real estate. Married and the father of three, Harrison has a new book, “The Rise of the Servant Kings: What the Bible Says About Being a Man.” This post is excerpted from that book.

Men, Bless Your Families This Christmas

December 12, 2019By Nicole StarkUncategorized

I love Christmas. It’s central to who I am as a follower of Christ. But in our commercialized world, Christmas also comes with pressure. Men are expected to give amazing gifts, and create memorable experiences, for their loved ones. So let me share some advice I’m trying to follow myself.

This Christmas, while you’re overwhelmed with making sure your loved ones have an incredible Christmas experience, consider that all they may really want . . . is you. Your time. Your focus. Your attention. Your love. Don’t get caught up in all the hustle and bustle. Rather, find peace in knowing you’re the gift your family craves. And enjoy the gift God has given to you in them. Here’s how I’m planning to do that:

FIRST – I’m committing to give my family my undivided attention. No phone, no email, no distractions. Family time this Christmas will be all about us together.

SECOND – I want to make the simple moments count. The sweet, funny, tender moments when we’re with each other, not doing anything special, just being together as a family.

THIRD – I’m going to pray for God to open opportunities for deeper and more meaningful conversation with the people I love most. Then, I’m going to pay attention for them.

These are the goals I’m challenging myself with. I challenge you to join me. Merry Christmas.

– Ken Harrison, Chairman and CEO of Promise Keepers

Masculinity is in Crisis—But We Can Turn It Around

August 19, 2019By Nicole StarkUncategorized

An Open Letter to Men from Ken Harrison, Chairman and CEO of Promise Keepers.

Today the men of America are like a sleeping giant. And I believe God is waking us up.

God is bringing pressure on men like never before. Our culture is turning up its nose at our masculinity. We’re called “toxic.” If we’re honest with ourselves, we know we’ve often failed. We’ve failed because we haven’t heeded God’s Word.

Men, it’s time for us to turn things around.

We live in a nation where millions of babies conceived by men lose their lives to abortion each year. Where women march in the streets to protest the men who’ve preyed on them. And where the most vulnerable are trafficked as sex slaves by men and for men.

Men, we can change this! But first, we have to know what the Bible says about our purpose, our role, and our calling.

Sadly, many men in America have never been taught true masculinity. They fritter their lives away on sports, pornography, and video games. They’re workaholics, alcoholics, drug addicts, and pleasure addicts.

Not surprisingly, many of our brothers face isolation, loneliness, and depression.

There’s an epidemic of suicide among men aged 15-24 and among middle-aged men. Too many men are apathetic. Bored. Sick and tired of wasting their lives.

Men, this is not what God made us for.

Our Creator made us in His image. He gave us strength and drive. He filled us with passion and energy. He made us warriors. And He expects us to use these traits for His glory.

I believe every man of us is called to be a servant king. A leader. A man of destiny. So let’s help each other shake off our apathy. Let’s get radical about removing our secret sins. And let’s get real with God.

Men, it’s time for us to show the world what it really means to be a man of integrity.

It’s time to pour out our lives to bless our wives, our children, our churches, and our communities.

It’s time to bring revival to our nation. We — the men of America — can do this if we repent and turn to God.

Are you with me?

The 2020 PK Conference: A Rally Cry for Men to Transform Our Nation

August 17, 2019By Nicole StarkUncategorized

Important update: Due to the impact of COVID-19, the Promise Keepers 2020 Conference has been moved to a virtual event. The contents included in this post may be out of date. Read the details here.

God designed men to lead our families. To cherish our wives. To be true brothers to other men. To protect the defenseless. To guard our communities and nation from harm.

But somehow, our God-given role has been forgotten. It’s been lost in a murky sea of gender fluidity, changing values, and distractions such as pornography, video games, and binge TV.

Promise Keepers is here to take it back. We’re here to rally our brothers as servant kings, leaders who will take a stand as men and change our nation for Christ.

That’s why we’re calling men to come together July 31 – August 1, 2020, at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, home of the Dallas Cowboys in the Dallas/Ft. Worth Metroplex.

We’re trusting God for 80,000+ men to fill the stadium. We will also simulcast the event to a projected 5 million men, spreading the impact far across the nation and the world.

Speakers will preach the Word of God with power. We’ll worship together as brothers and shake the stadium’s foundations. We’ll fall on our faces in repentance. And we’ll return home changed men.

But the impact won’t stop with the event. We’re asking men to join small, local teams for accountability and changemaking in their communities. We’ll stay connected and focused through a Promise Keepers app. Together we’re building a movement, not an events ministry.

You need to be part of this! Talk to your pastor. Get a group of guys together. Mark your calendar for July 31–August 1, 2020. Plan to come to Dallas-Ft. Worth or host a simulcast in your community.

The men of America have been asleep. It’s time for us to wake up. Our families, our churches, our communities, and our nation need us. Don’t miss this.

Get tickets now and join us for Promise Keepers 2020.

Men, We Need to Have Courage

August 17, 2019By Nicole StarkRise of the Servant Kings

The Bible is filled with stories of immense bravery: Moses leading millions of people into the desert with no water or food; David fighting Goliath; Gideon; Jeremiah; Esther; Abraham. The apostle Paul’s life is one long saga of bravery and suffering. 

And at the core of courage is humility. Humility was the mark of each of these heroes’ lives. There were some falters, especially with Abraham, but courage marked by humility was the overarching quality that each possessed.

Courage isn’t something conjured up at the moment that it is needed. It is the expression of your character at a moment of testing. Courage is the sum of all your virtues expressed at a single moment in time. 

Courage Reflects Who You Really Are 

The person you have been, your secret thoughts, the skeletons in your closet, and a lifetime of training suddenly spill out. Would you run into a burning building to save a child with a crowd watching? What if no one is looking? What if you are rescuing an old man instead of a child? What if it is your enemy?

Near one of San Diego’s best surfing spots, Solana Beach, a sixty-six-year-old man was training for a triathlon. He was just off Fletcher Cove and in a line with several swimmers when he exploded from the water, both legs in the mouth of a twelve-to-seventeen-foot great white shark. The man emerged long enough to scream that he was being attacked before being dragged under again. 

Despite the obvious danger, two swimmers in front of the man turned and swam back to him, into the growing cloud of blood where a monstrous shark lurked, and pulled the man through the surf 150 yards to shore. Sadly, he died a few minutes later.

Courage is the expression of someone who sees something more valuable than herself.

Courage defends a victim by standing up to the bully, even though he’s bigger.

Courage says grace aloud in a restaurant.

Courage witnesses to a stranger. A lack of humility says, “I don’t want to ask that woman if she knows Jesus. I might look stupid.” This is an attitude that values self more than another person’s soul.

“Hang on. That’s not fair! I don’t really know how to share my faith,” you might object. Then care enough to learn. Put down your pride and pick up a book by Greg Stier of Dare 2 Share. He’ll teach you how.

Countless times I have seen my wife walk up to a stranger, say something brief and watched while the woman crumbles in tears. Elliette prays beside her for a long while, and then the woman hugs her tightly. I used to ask Elliette, “What was that all about?” “God just told me to go ask that woman if I could pray with her,” she’d answer. “I hate it when He does that. I’m always terrified that I’ll look stupid.” Yet she obeys and lives are changed.

Courage isn’t a lack of fear. It’s being terrified and obeying anyway. Here we see why humility is the foundation of courage. True courage flows out of concern for others without regard to the risk to oneself.

Judging Courage

“The spiritual person, however, can evaluate everything, yet he himself cannot be evaluated by anyone” (1 Corinthians 2:15, HCSB). Many Bible translations use the word judge where the word evaluate is used in this scripture. The English language has two meanings for the word judge: one is “evaluate”; the other is “condemn.” People who don’t follow Christ love to quote Jesus saying that we are not to judge (Matthew 7:1, HCSB). Jesus means not to condemn. He isn’t telling a godly person not to evaluate or discern.

How do we evaluate or judge true courage? Courage is an outward expression, but its true motivation is inward, and we can’t observe that. As an example, let’s take two platoon commanders in the same battle. 

Both charge a machine-gun nest, brave the bullets, and save their men. Each gets a medal for his actions.

The first man saw that the guns would soon mow down his men. He was drafted into the war; he didn’t volunteer. He comes from a broken home with no father to teach him honor in battle. Terrified and without thinking, he charges to save the lives of his men. He captures the guns, and his men live.

The second man is also terrified. He comes from a decorated military family. He joined the military because that’s what all the men in his family do. He looks around for escape and sees none. He doesn’t care about his men, but is terrified to be branded as a coward. He’d never be able to look the members of his family in the eye again. Seeing no way out of his predicament, he charges and his men are saved.

Are these men the same? We don’t see their hearts; we see their actions. They each earned the military reward that is given by mere men, but God knows who they are on the inside, why they did what they did. “I, Yahweh, examine the mind, I test the heart to give to each according to his way, according to what his actions deserve” (Jeremiah 17:10, HCSB).

One man says grace in a restaurant with meekness and humility out of pure gratitude to God, who gave him the meal. Another says grace to impress the people around him with how religious he is. He smacks of religious pride. Both have completed the same action, but one said grace in humility and the other in pride.

So how do we properly judge courage? We judge it only in ourselves. We can judge — evaluate — others only by their actions, because we can’t truly know their motivations. And this is where the man of God must dwell — at a point of constant self-examination:

Why did I say that? Why did I react that way?

Guard your heart and your integrity. Courage, or lack of it, is a window that reveals your level of humility, which makes it a primary signpost on your walk with Christ . . . and on your journey to becoming one of God’s servant kings.

Excerpted from Rise of the Servant Kings: What the Bible Says About Being a Man by Ken Harrison, Chairman and CEO of Promise Keepers. To download a free chapter, go to RiseoftheServantKings.com. Ken is donating all the profits from the book sales to Promise Keepers.